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Gene-Edited Food shall be the Futuristic Food

World Food Scientists are viewing that the World population shall be doubled in 2015, in view of that the Scientist are finding out the newer ways and means to increase the production. One is Genetically Modified and the other is Gene Editing. With the help of gene editing named `CRISPR-Cas9`. It shall  be working as value addition of the food, may solve the problem. The DuPont Pioneer is developing a strain of CRISPR-edited Corn. It shall increase the faster pace to breed healthier pigs and cows. Spain Scientists shall be coming with wheat editing which shall be safe for human consumption.

In the near future, scientists will engineer food that grows faster and does not spoil.This is the promise of CRISPR/Cas 9, a game-changing gene-editing tool. Bioengineered food could end world hunger. And, at least in theory, it would be perfectly safe. With CRISPR, scientists can literally edit organisms, removing the bits that lead to unfavorable outcomes.

In the near future, scientists will engineer food that grows faster and does not spoil.

This is the promise of CRISPR/Cas 9, a game-changing gene-editing tool.Bioengineered food could end world hunger. And, at least in theory, it would be perfectly safe.

 

With CRISPR, scientists can literally edit organisms, removing the bits that lead to unfavorable outcomes.

Ethicists worry about a rush toward designer babies. And there have been some disturbing developments on that end in China. However, the real opportunity in the near term has always been agriculture.

Organisms are constantly undergoing this process naturally. They evolve. It just takes time. Gene editing speeds the process, shaving off years, decades and even millennia.

This is very different from GMOs, or genetically modified organisms. GMOs introduce foreign organisms to improve outcomes

Gene editing plants and livestock with CRISPR has picked up speed as the technology has recently become less complicated and more efficient. “CRISPR-Cas9 [a form of the technology that relies on the Cas9 protein] is much easier to use than historical technologies and is therefore being rapidly adopted,” According to  Rachel Haurwitz, CEO of Caribou Biosciences.

The  previous methods of gene editing are similar to CRISPR but are more complex, time-consuming and expensive. Robert Henry, Director of the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation in Australia, says that CRISPR and other agricultural genetics will help humans survive sustainably. “The world population doubled in the second half of the last century, but we more than doubled food production,” says Henry, and humanity did it “substantially by genetics.” As the global population continues to rise, Henry is confident we’ll ramp up food production again, “and we’ll do it by two means: genetics and management.”

DuPont Pioneer is developing a strain of CRISPR-edited corn that could be on the market in five years. U.K. livestock company Genus Breeding is using CRISPR to breed healthier pigs and cows at a faster pace. Scientists in Spain recently used CRISPR to edit wheat so that it’s safe for people with celiac disease. Berkeley start-up Caribou Biosciences is working directly with Genus and DuPont to get edited crops and meat on store shelves faster.

CRISPR, which works by finding and then replacing, editing or deleting a genetic sequence inside an organism, is currently being tested in agricultural products in several countries, including the U.S., U.K. and Spain.

But not everyone is enthusiastic about that prospect. Staunch anti-GMO advocates don’t know what to make of CRISPR-edited food yet, but they’re not so sure they want it on their plates. The technology isn’t waiting, though.

 

 

Chander Mohan

Krishi Jagran / New Delhi



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