1. Success Story

This Indore Based Startup is Helping Over 500 Moms Sell Homemade Food Products

MomsKart, which was founded in 2021, has over 1,000 non-perishable food goods listed on its site, with over 500 women sellers and a network of over 5,000 bloggers.

Binita Kumari
What began as a platform for his mother grew into a community of over 500 mompreneurs from throughout the country selling their homemade food goods.
What began as a platform for his mother grew into a community of over 500 mompreneurs from throughout the country selling their homemade food goods.

Aman Porwal, 21, grew up watching his mother smoothly balance the roles of parent and entrepreneur. The engineer was inspired by her pride and joy to help his mother's homemade treats reach a wider audience.

To begin, he set up a modest website and a social media profile called mom made namkeen wala and began listing food items prepared by his mother at home. The platform's success inspired Aman to explore how it could help more mompreneurs connect and monetize their homemade food products, such as pickles, jams, and snacks, in a more organised way.

Soon, what began as a platform for his mother grew into a community of over 500 mompreneurs from throughout the country selling their homemade food goods.

MomsKart, an e-commerce platform that sells homemade food items prepared by mothers, was born from these seeds. Non-perishable items with a minimum shelf life of 25 days, such as pickles, jams, and snacks, fall into this category.

MomsKart evolved from a mom-made namkeen wala over the course of approximately two years for Aman, who was always learning.

During his computer science engineering days at Acropolis Institute of Technology and Research in Indore, the engineer was bitten by the entrepreneurial bug. During his first year, he was exposed to the e-cell and was immediately captivated by the company.

The entrepreneur shares a fascinating story about his first "informal venture." Aman had gathered a group of juniors to work on assignments/projects for final-year students who were frequently missing lectures due to test preparation. "That business paid for my full engineering fees," Aman quips.

Instead of being reprimanded or punished for being caught, Aman's e-cell professors praised and encouraged him for taking the risk. "In a way, this gave me the confidence and motivation to pursue a career in the startup world," he continues.

Aman invented a recyclable baby diaper solution in his second year of college, which was named one of the top 25 innovations by the Confederation of Indian Industries (CII).

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