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Farmers in Punjab Begin Early Sowing of Paddy

Farmers in several villages in Malwa, Punjab have begun transplanting paddy ahead of time for the official start of paddy transplantation on June 17.

Kritika Madhukar
According to the state government, no farmer in Malwa will be allowed to plant paddy before June 17
According to the state government, no farmer in Malwa will be allowed to plant paddy before June 17

Since the Punjab State Power Corporation Limited (PSPCL) is not currently providing electricity to paddy farmers, they have been using diesel generators to power irrigation motors. "Farmers are sowing long-duration paddy varieties," said BKU (Ekta Ugrahan) leader Shingara Singh Mann. 

If they wait until June 17, the crop will ripen late, causing them problems." He demanded that the government release water from the dry canals and channels. According to Mann, this would reduce the strain on groundwater.

According to the state government, no farmer in Malwa will be allowed to plant paddy before June 17. Previously, paddy transplantation began on June 1; however, for the past few years, the government has delayed the practice in order to control the falling water table, reduce the burden of subsidy, and improve the quality of basmati rice. 

Farmers, however, appear unconcerned. Paddy transplantation has begun in villages where farm unions rule. 

"Farmers need not be concerned about the government's order," farmer leader Gora Singh Bhainibagha said. They should begin planting paddy without fear."

Manjeet Singh, Mansa's Chief Agriculture Officer, stated, "I have started a campaign to take action against farmers who transplant paddy before June 17." Paddy is going to be uprooted."

Last year, despite state government orders to begin transplanting paddy crops on June 13, a group of farmers began planting saplings on June 1. They even threatened to stage a protest if their crop was uprooted. The state government relaxed the schedule by moving the date from June 20 to June 13 in 2019.

"It is populist to demand early paddy transplanting as a short-term gain while ignoring reports of drastically depleted groundwater in the state." "The state government should exercise caution and refuse to give in to such demands," said a retired agriculture department officer.

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