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Lower Kharif Plantings Due to Irregular Rainfall a Growing Concern: Report

The eastern part of India, including Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, and West Bengal, has received insufficient rainfall, which has hampered rice planting, the main Kharif crop. South India, on the other hand, received excessive rain, according to the report. According to the report, the states of north and north-east India, including Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, and Jammu and Kashmir, received normal rainfall.

Shivam Dwivedi
Paddy
Paddy

According to a new report from the Bank of Baroda, the South-West monsoon has produced 6% more rain than normal or long-period average (LPA) rains in India through August 5, but geographical disparities have hampered the planting of Kharif crops such as rice.

The area planted to cereals, including rice, is less than last year due to a lack of rain in major growing states such as Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, and Bihar, according to the report. Cereal acreage has decreased from 40.2 million hectares last year to 37.4 million hectares this year, while rice acreage has decreased from 26.7 million hectares last year to 23.2 million hectares in 2022—a drop of more than 13%.

In India, the sown area for pulses has also decreased in the 2022 Kharif season, which runs from June to October. In comparison to last year, the area cultivated for pulses has decreased by 2.5 percent. Within pulses, the area under Arhar has decreased by 10.4%, and Urad sowing has decreased by 6% since 2021. However, the planting of Moong has increased by 2.5 percent within pulses, according to the report.

According to the agriculture ministry's acreage report released on July 29th, this area is under rice. On August 5, the Ministry did not release the most recent acreage figures. Every Friday, the data is usually published. According to the report, the sown area of oilseeds has increased marginally from 17.4 million hectares in 2021-22 to 17.5 million hectares in 2022-23.

Overall rainfall across the country has been lower this year, according to the report. India received 50mm of rain between June 1 and August 5 this year, compared to 63mm in the same period last year.

The eastern part of India, including Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, and West Bengal, has received insufficient rainfall, which has hampered rice planting, the main Kharif crop. South India, on the other hand, received excessive rain, according to the report. According to the report, the states of north and north-east India, including Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, and Jammu and Kashmir, received normal rainfall.

Telangana, Karnataka, and Tamil Nadu experienced above-average rainfall. According to the report, this is 34% higher than normal for the Southern Peninsula.

Reservoirs in Southern India have the most stored water in the country due to above-average rains. These levels, however, are at 77 percent of total capacity, down from 80 percent at this time last year. In comparison, reservoir storage levels in North India stood at 50% of total capacity, up from 40% last year.

Furthermore, the report stated that excess rainfall was recorded in India's Western belt, which included the states of Rajasthan, Gujarat, and Maharashtra. As a result, reservoir capacity increased to 69% of total storage, up from 51% at the same time last year. Higher reservoir storage levels facilitate crop sowing during the winter or Rabi crop season, which begins in October-November.

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