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5 Things to Do to Your Garden in March

As March is around the corner and the daylight hours grow longer, your garden plants are waking up as well. Spring is not only delightful for us humans but also for our leafy friends as longer daylights mean new growth to them. To make sure your plants stay healthy, here are 5 things you can do in your garden in March:

Binita Kumari
Gardening
Starting to plant early potatoes, onions, garlic, and shallots now is also a smart idea

As March is around the corner and the daylight hours grow longer, your garden plants are waking up as well. Spring is not only delightful for us humans but also our leafy friends as longer daylights means new growth to them. To make sure your plants are stay healthy, here are 5 things you can do in your garden in March:

What to Grow in Your Plant in March?

Plant salad greens, tomatoes, lettuce, and cauliflower in a covered area. Peas, carrots, beets, summer and fall cabbage, herbs, leeks, spinach, turnips, spring onions, broad beans, Brussels sprouts, and parsnips can all be sown outside. Starting to plant early potatoes, onions, garlic, and shallots now is also a smart idea.

Repot Houseplants

Before spring growth starts, make sure to carefully remove the plant from its pot and move it into the next bigger-sized pot to make room for growth. While repotting, make sure to untangle any tangled roots and shake off all the remaining soil from the old pot to make sure the roots are ready to anchor into the new soil. Replant in fresh soil, add in some organic fertilizers, and then top it all with a handful of small, round gravel to retain the moisture of the soil and give it a finished look!

Get Pruning

This is the perfect time to start pruning your shrubs and trees before birds start renting them for making nests. Light pruning will do the job of keeping the shrubs and trees in shape and within their space. Apart from this, pruning is also beneficial for the strong and healthy growth of the plant. When you remove all the dead and diseased branches, the plant’s energy doesn’t waste on them and is instead channeled into new, healthy growth. Another tip is to remove all the downward-pointing branches that will eventually get damaged when they make contact with the ground.

Clear the Flowerbeds

Clear out all the weeds and unwanted plants from the flowerbed to make room for the new, desired plants. Most weeds and small plants don’t require herbicides or any chemicals for removal. You can easily pull them out of the ground by using your hands. However, make sure to wear gloves for this task. Remove the weed from the roots itself so that there is no chance of it growing back again in 4 days.

For dead and decaying plants, you can use a spade or shovel to dig them out of the ground. But first, loosen up the ground by adding some water to it to make your work easier. Make sure the roots are completely removed. Then use these dug-up plants as fertilizers and add them to the soil along with manure to make it healthy and ready for newcomers.

Mulch Heavily

After you are done clearing up the flowerbed, start mulching. Mulching helps in controlling weed growth, retaining moisture in the soil, and enriching it with nutrients. You can use wood chips, shredded leaves, compost stray, and hay to mulch. Make sure you have 2-3 inches of mulch on top of the soil to avoid weed growth.

Protect Your Garden

With the changing pleasant and warm weather come irritating insects hungry for plants. To keep out the critters, here are some things you can do:

  • Pick out all the bigger bugs like slugs from the plants and remove them from the garden.

  • Throw out the sickly plants that attract bugs like a honey traps.

  • Place beneficial insects that love to munch on harmful bugs such as ladybugs, honeybee,s and dragonflies.

  • Use organic insecticides like garlic spray and salt spray to drive out the smaller bugs.

  • You can even consider netting your plants for better security.

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