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Lumpy Skin Disease: Over 2,000 Cattle Killed in Karnataka, Government to Provide Rs 13 Crore

Lumpy skin disease has affected about 45,645 cattle in Karnataka as per the state government.

Shruti Kandwal
Rs 2 crore has already been released as compensation to affected farmers
Rs 2 crore has already been released as compensation to affected farmers

In the wake of increasing lumpy skin disease cases in cattle, Chief Minister of Karnataka, Basavaraj Bommai, directed the Finance Department to immediately release Rs 13 crore for the treatment of animals suffering from the disease. The Chief Minister also said that compensation will be paid for the death of cattle.

During a meeting, the Chief Minister gave the order to review the steps taken to slow the disease's rapid spread. The disease has been identified in 4,380 villages over 160 taluks in 28 districts. 26,135 of the 45,645 animals affected by the disease have recovered, while 2,070 have died.

According to a government statement, the minister directed officials to increase the vaccination campaign, particularly in the regions of Haveri and Kolar where the prevalence is high.

According to the chief minister, Rs 2 crore has already been released as compensation for the loss of the livestock. The treatment of cattle will receive an additional 5 crore, and vaccination of cattle will receive an additional 8 crore. He further added that 6.57 lakh cattle head in the State has already received the disease vaccine.

Karnataka CM: ‘LSD will not spread by drinking cow milk'

The Chief Minister made the point that people cannot contract the lumpy disease by consuming milk from sick cows and that widespread awareness must be raised in this regard. The disease must be controlled in areas that have been severely affected, like Haveri and Kolar, and precautions must be taken to stop it from spreading to other areas. 

Cattle are susceptible to LSD, a common viral disease that can cause fever, skin nodules, and even death. The disease is spread through contaminated food and water, as well as by direct contact between cattle, mosquitoes, flies, lice, and wasps.

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