1. Home
  2. Blog

Why Banana Might Perish Due to Climate Change?

The humble banana, a botanical berry, is not only well-known for its numerous health advantages, but it is also the only fruit that is affordable to the average person. Since centuries ago, the banana has been India's most versatile and cherished fruit.

Shruti Kandwal
India was the world's top banana grower between 2010 and 2017, producing 29 million tonnes per year
India was the world's top banana grower between 2010 and 2017, producing 29 million tonnes per year

The humble banana, a botanical berry, is not only well-known for its numerous health advantages, but it is also the only fruit that is affordable to the average person. Since centuries ago, the banana has been India's most versatile and cherished fruit.

In India, the banana is seen to be a cure-all for all bodily and spiritual ailments. However, according to studies, bananas are not immune to climate change, and rising temperatures throughout the world could mean the end for the fruit that feeds millions of people every day.

Since the 1960s, global warming has aided in increasing banana output at an annual rate of 0.024 tonnes per hectare, resulting in an average rise of 1.37 tonnes per hectare across 27 nations.

According to research published in Nature Climate Change, prolonged warming might delay or even reverse harvest in some regions, resulting in yield drops of 0.59-0.19 tonnes per hectare by 2050.

Effects on Indian farming

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), India was the world's top banana grower between 2010 and 2017, producing 29 million tonnes per year. India produces over a third of the world's bananas.

According to the FAO, the average output of bananas in India is roughly 60 tonnes per hectare.

However, if no efforts are made in preparing tropical agriculture for future climate change, the banana production in India might start falling by 2050, according to the study.

According to the University of Exeter report, India, the world's largest producer and consumer of bananas, would witness a decrease in yield, as will nine other nations such as Brazil.

"With expected unfavourable implications of future climate change compared to good effects in the past," the scientists write, "India might see a big turnaround." However, in the case of India, the reduction in output due to climate change might be reduced by significant, technology-driven yield-increasing initiatives.

Bananas come in over 1,000 different kinds, but the Cavendish variety accounts for approximately half of worldwide banana output.

Bananas are an important crop for millions of people throughout the world. Bananas are a staple grain for an estimated 400 million people, therefore there are food security issues.

Fungus strains killing bananas

According to a recent study by experts in the United States and the Netherlands, numerous strains of a fungus are posing serious dangers to the world's banana plants. In fact, if left unchecked, the fungus may wipe out the world's entire supply of crucial fruit in a few of years.

Panama disease, commonly known as banana wilt, is a deadly banana disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum forma specialis cubense, a soil-inhabiting fungus species.

To make the matter worse, bananas are produced from shoot cuttings, and all Cavendish bananas come from a single plant, implying that they are genetically identical clones.

They are more susceptible to deadly illnesses due to their limited genetic diversity. A disease that can kill one plant may easily destroy all of them.

Test your knowledge on Shaheed diwas (Martyrs' Day) by taking this quiz. Take a quiz
Share your comments

Subscribe to our Newsletter. You choose the topics of your interest and we'll send you handpicked news and latest updates based on your choice.

Subscribe Newsletters