1. Agriculture World

Govt Removes Genome Edited Crops from Stringent GM Regulations

Although genome editing or gene editing was found in 2012, it took nearly a decade for Indian regulators to realize its potential for generating crops that are resistant to biotic and abiotic challenges and have nutritional superiority.

Binita Kumari
Gene editing can be used to achieve the same goals as traditional crossbreeding in agricultural applications.
Gene editing can be used to achieve the same goals as traditional crossbreeding in agricultural applications.

The Central government has issued a far-reaching decision exempting certain types of genome-edited crops from the severe laws that apply to genetically modified or GM crops for the first time, paving the way for more study and development.

In an order, the ministry of environment and forest exempted SDN1 and SDN2 genome-edited plants from Rules 7-11 of the Environment Protect Act (EPA), which govern the manufacture, use, import, export, and storage of dangerous microorganisms or genetically modified organisms or cells.

"The notification will pave the way for the government to approve and notify the genome-edited plant guidelines, which have been pending since early 2020," said Bhagirath Choudhary, Founder Director of the South Asia Biotechnology Centre (SABC).

Many countries have recently created or approved for commercial production vegetables, fruits, oilseeds, and cereals developed through genome editing, such as GABA tomato, high oleic canola and soybean, non-browning mushroom, and so on.

China has authorized genome editing standards, which will encourage research into high-yielding, pest-resistant, and climate-change-resistant crops.

Although genome editing or gene editing was found in 2012, it took nearly a decade for Indian regulators to realize its potential for generating crops that are resistant to biotic and abiotic challenges and have nutritional superiority.

"The latest notification exempting specific kinds of genome-edited plants from onerous requirements would encourage breeders and researchers to use genome editing to benefit the farming community," stated SBAC's Choudhury.

About Gene Editing: Genome editing (also known as gene editing) refers to a set of technologies that allow scientists to alter an organism's DNA.

These technologies allow for the addition, removal, or modification of genetic material at specific points in the genome. There have been several ways of genome editing developed.

Plant genome editing is currently largely done by combining the two techniques: Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of DNA encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) protein and an engineered guide RNA into plant cells, followed by tissue culture to regenerate an edited plant.

Gene editing can be used to achieve the same goals as traditional crossbreeding in agricultural applications. Gene editing involves making modest, subtle, and precise changes to a gene or collection of genes in the DNA of plants, animals, and humans.

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