1. Agriculture World

Mango Time: Totapuri Variety Has Made its Way Into City Market

The Totapuri variety of mangoes is grown by the majority of farmers since there are approximately 50-60 pulp companies which take large quantities of these fruits. This type provides significant benefits to farmers.

Shruti Kandwal
Totapuri Mangoes
Totapuri Mangoes

When it comes to scrumptious mouth-watering mangoes, nothing compares the summer season, which has always been a pleasant and necessary aspect of Indian life. This season, the totapuri mango variety has arrived in the Mysuru market. The additional mango types should arrive next week.

The Totapuri variety of mangoes is grown by the majority of farmers since there are approximately 50-60 pulp companies which take large quantities of these fruits. This type provides significant benefits to farmers.

Changes in the flowering cycle and the fruiting pattern, brought on by unseasonal rain and climate change, have impacted agricultural productivity in Mysuru and Chamarajanagar this season, potentially driving up costs.

According to many mango sellers, the totapuri has recently arrived at the market and the fruits are available at Hopcoms shops and fruit stands. It’s now being sold on the streets by pushcart vendors. Fruits of good quality are sold for Rs 80-100 per kg. “Once other varities of mangoes flood the market, the price may drop down,” said Mahadevaiah, a fruit seller.

“Mango trees usually begin blossoming in December, and mangoes come around the third week of March or at the end of April.” However, due to changes in temperature and unseasonal rain throughout November and December, which is the important flowering and harvest delayed the arrivals and production this year,” said Kaleem Ulla, a mango planter in Chamarajanagar district.

Last year’s mango crop was also impacted by delayed flowering as per K Rudresh, deputy director of horticulture department. Mango output has also been hampered by a lack of rain. Mango flowers require dry, chilly conditions in order to bloom. He claims that favorable weather conditions have hindered mango production. In Mysuru, mangoes are produced on 3,500 hectares of land, whereas in Chamarajanagar, they are planted on 930 hectares.

In addition to local mangoes, traders from Channapatna and Ramanagar also sell mangoes in Mysuru. Farmers in the region grow badami, raspuri, malgova, totapuri, mallika, dasheri and other types, he stated.

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