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Viral Video: Man Demonstrates Products Made From a Diverse Range of Organic Wastes

It is time for hotels, restaurants, and food joints to quit using prohibited plastic containers in Tamil Nadu and move to sustainable green alternatives. A video of a man demonstrating products made from rice bran recently went viral.

Shivani Meena
Man demonstrating teacups made up of Rice Bran
Man demonstrating teacups made up of Rice Bran

The man holds out eco-friendly food containers, mugs, and glasses in the video, which was released on Twitter by Supriya Sahu, Principal Secretary of Environment, Climate Change, and Forests in Tamil Nadu. "Food containers made of rice bran are leak-proof, inexpensive, disposable, and environmentally friendly," she added.

"Food containers made of rice bran are leak-proof, inexpensive, disposable, and environmentally friendly," she added.

 It is time for hotels, restaurants, and food joints to quit using prohibited plastic containers in Tamil Nadu and move to sustainable green alternatives of plastic. 

Later, Congress MP Shashi Tharoor retweeted the message and encouraged the government to increase the production of such environmentally friendly alternatives for everyday use. "Madam came to our stall at a Tamil Nadu Government-organized show in Chennai to promote the Meendum Manjappai campaign." I've been getting a lot of calls since she released the video. 

"People are curious," says Kalyan Kumar, the man in the video. So far, a millet exporter from Trichy has approached him about repurposing 12 tonnes of millet waste, a farmer from Panruti has asked about ways to upcycle rice straws, and numerous coir farmers from the Pollachi belt near Coimbatore have inquired about repurposing coir waste. 

SPS Kalyan machine Designers: The Small Machinery Unit with a solution of every Organic waste 

Since the video went viral, Kalyan's small machinery unit, SPS Kalyan Machine Designers, based in Mathampallayam, 25 kilometers from Coimbatore, has seen a continuous stream of visitors. "Any organic waste may be recycled utilizing the multi-biodegradable equipment that we make here," Kalyan explains as he holds up a tray made from banana fiber. On his table, there are airtight food boxes fashioned from teak wood sawdust, as well as rice bran and areca leaf plates. Teacups constructed from leftover red chilli stalks vie for attention as well. "It may be used to serve hot beverages such as soups," he says. 

Attractive features of the multi-biodegradable machine 

According to Kalyan, the machine can recycle up to 15 different raw materials, such as rice bran,  rice straw,  rice husk, wheat bran, and nine different types of non-poisonous wood powder, tamarind seeds, and peanut shells. "Even agricultural waste, such as the skin of stick tubers, banana trees, and discarded bananas branches, could become raw material," he says. 

He has delivered equipment throughout Tamil Nadu, as well as Sri Lanka, Australia, and Saudi Arabia, in the previous two years. One of his most recent machines is on its way to a customer in Belgium to recycle beer waste into wine glasses and teacups. "The ultimate product is made by combining 700 grams of organic waste with 300 grams of food-grade solution, which I provide (he has patented this)." "Name any organic waste, and I'll offer you a ready answer," he adds confidently. 

Multibiodegradable machine as the tool limit environmental concern of plastic 

The key is to care for the environment, says Kalyan, who also profited on the need for eco-friendly airtight food containers during the outbreak. "If we are to reduce the usage of paper and plastic cups, we must continuously innovate." We may also supply a bottom guard for teacups to paste seeds and utilize for mass distribution of seeds for green drives. Cups made of rice bran and coir can also be used to pack glass objects for export industries." 

Kalyan promotes waste recycling. "A used paper cup retains its shape after three years. The biodegradable materials, on the other hand, break down within eight hours of contact with water. We learned via talks with tea shop owners that they prefer paper and plastic cups since they are more readily available. "An eco-friendly alternative, such as a rice bran cup (in which the beverage stays warm for up to 45 minutes!), can only enter that market with awareness and mass manufacturing," he adds, adding, "It is encouraging when people come forward and buy such innovations." It provides us with hope." 

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