1. Health & Lifestyle

Signs of High Cholesterol: Do Not Ignore These Symptoms!

To build healthy cells, your body requires cholesterol, a waxy substance found in the blood. High cholesterol, on the other hand, can cause fatty deposits in your blood vessels. These deposits can rupture suddenly and form a clot, resulting in a heart attack or stroke. To avoid problems, it's very important to get your cholesterol levels out of the red zone.

Laavanya Arya
High cholesterol can cause fatty deposits in your blood vessels.
High cholesterol can cause fatty deposits in your blood vessels.

To build healthy cells, your body requires cholesterol, a waxy substance found in the blood. High cholesterol, on the other hand, can cause fatty deposits in your blood vessels. These deposits can rupture suddenly and form a clot, resulting in a heart attack or stroke. To avoid problems, it's very important to get your cholesterol levels out of the red zone. High cholesterol levels in the body can cause cardiovascular disease, coronary artery disease, and stroke. Because high cholesterol has no symptoms, it is often referred to as a silent killer. To detect high cholesterol levels, a blood test is required.

Leg warning signs: Excess weight or body fat are commonly identified as indicators of high cholesterol. However, some warning signs may appear in other parts of your body, such as your legs.  Peripheral arterial disease, or PAD, is the blockage of arteries in the extremities, and some of the arteries that may be impacted may supply blood to the legs. As a result, it is important not to ignore these symptoms and to seek medical attention if you notice them.

Cold feet and legs: High cholesterol levels can cause your feet or legs to feel cold or chilly all year, even in the summer. This could be an indication that you have PAD, but it does not necessarily mean that you only have PAD. However, if you notice that one leg or foot is cold but not the other, consult your doctor.

Skin color alteration: A decrease in blood flow caused by high cholesterol can also change the color of your skin. Because of the decreased flow of blood carrying nutrients and oxygen, the cells are not receiving adequate nourishment. Attempting to elevate the legs, for example, can make the skin appear pale, whereas hanging it from a table can make the skin appear purple or bluish.

Pain: One of the most common symptoms of PAD is leg pain. When the arteries in your legs become clogged, enough oxygen-rich blood does not reach your lower body. It has the potential to make your leg feel heavy and tired. The majority of people with high cholesterol experience burning pain in their lower limbs. Pain can occur in any part of the leg, from the calf to the thigh or buttock, and in one or both legs. This is most commonly caused by physical activities such as walking, jogging, and stair climbing. This discomfort usually goes away when you rest, but it may return when you start moving your legs again.

Cramps during the night: Another common symptom of high cholesterol levels damaging the arteries of the lower limbs is intense leg cramps while sleeping. During the night, the condition worsens. When sleeping, people with PAD may experience cramps or spasms, most commonly in the heel, forefoot, or toes. Dangling the foot off the bed or sitting can provide relief by allowing gravity to assist blood flow to the feet.

Ulcers that don’t heal: Leg or foot ulcers are open wounds or unhealed sores. These ulcers can reoccur if they are not treated. Poor circulation is the most common cause of this condition. Ulcers that do not heal or heal slowly may indicate that high cholesterol is preventing blood flow to your legs. People with PDA will be unable to walk far or quickly due to tired, achy legs. Leg ulcers can improve without causing further complications if treated early.

Cholesterol levels should be checked regularly: High cholesterol, the silent killer, should always be kept under control. After being diagnosed with high cholesterol, one should make dietary and lifestyle changes to reduce the level of low-density lipoprotein, or bad cholesterol. Low-density lipoprotein levels should normally be less than 70 milligrams per decilitre.

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