1. Home
  2. News

Govt Panel to Look Into Impact of High Temperature on Wheat Crop, say Officials

According to government officials, India has formed a panel of officials to assess the impact of rising temperatures on the wheat crop, as the weather service warned that above-normal temperatures would prevail in key producing states.

Shivam Dwivedi
Committee will be led by India's agriculture commissioner, and it will include representatives from the country's key wheat-growing states
Committee will be led by India's agriculture commissioner, and it will include representatives from the country's key wheat-growing states

The world's second largest wheat producer announced earlier this month that production would likely increase 4.1% to a record 112.2 million tonnes. However, a lack of winter rains has caused temperatures to rise in some northern Indian states where farmers grow wheat.

According to weather officials, the daily average temperature reached early to mid-March levels last week. India, the world's second-largest consumer of wheat, banned exports in May 2022 after a sharp, unexpected rise in temperatures cut output, even as export demand increased to meet the global shortfall caused by the Russia-Ukraine conflict.

"The government has decided to form a committee to monitor the impact of higher temperatures," said one of the officials, who did not want to be identified in accordance with official rules.

The committee will be led by India's agriculture commissioner, and it will include representatives from the country's key wheat-growing states as well as government scientists. Maximum temperatures in some states this week reached 39 degrees Celsius, up to 9 degrees Celsius above normal, according to a statement issued by the India Meteorological Department (IMD) on Monday.

Maximum temperatures are expected to remain 5 to 7 degrees Celsius above normal in many parts of northwest India over the next three days, according to the forecast. This higher day temperature may have an adverse effect on wheat as it approaches the reproductive growth period, which is temperature sensitive.

"High temperatures during flowering and maturation lead to yield loss," according to the IMD. The country only grows one wheat crop per year, with planting in October and November and harvesting beginning in March.

Take a Quiz on Green Revolution Take a quiz
Share your comments
FactCheck in Agriculture Project

Subscribe to our Newsletter. You choose the topics of your interest and we'll send you handpicked news and latest updates based on your choice.

Subscribe Newsletters