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New High-Yielding Wheat Variety Developed by Haryana Agricultural University

Scientists at Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University have developed WH 1402, a potential game-changer for farmers in Northern India.

KJ Staff
This high-yielding wheat variant has been designed to thrive with just two spells of irrigation and moderate fertilisers. (Representational Image, Courtesy: Freepik)
This high-yielding wheat variant has been designed to thrive with just two spells of irrigation and moderate fertilisers. (Representational Image, Courtesy: Freepik)

The Wheat and Barley Section at Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University (HAU) has introduced a wheat variety - WH 1402. This high-yielding wheat variant has been designed to thrive with just two spells of irrigation and moderate fertilisers, presenting a promising solution for farmers facing water scarcity.

Resilient and High-Yielding Wheat

HAU Vice Chancellor, Prof BR Kamboj, highlighted the adaptability of WH 1402 to the plains of Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan, Delhi, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, and Jammu and Kashmir. Boasting an average yield of 50 quintals per hectare and a maximum yield of 68 quintals per hectare in only two irrigation sessions, this new variety is a game-changer for agricultural productivity.

Wheat Combatting Diseases and Boosting Yield

Kamboj emphasised that WH 1402 exhibits resistance against prevalent diseases like yellow rust, brown rust, and others. Additionally, it surpasses the yield of NIAW 3170, a well-regarded variety in low-water zones, by 7.5 percent.

Addressing Water Depletion

The vice chancellor recommended specific fertiliser usage - 90 kg pure nitrogen, 60 kg phosphorus, 40 kg potash, and 25 kg zinc sulfate per hectare. This approach aims to curb over-exploitation of groundwater, especially in regions with declining water tables. This development holds the potential to alleviate water-related challenges in areas with limited water resources.

National-Level Release

Prof BR Kamboj proudly announced that the new variety has received national-level approval, making it particularly beneficial for sandy, less fertile, and water-scarce regions. Agriculture College Dean Dr SK Pahuja advised farmers to sow this variety between the last week of October and the first week of November, using 100 kg of seeds per hectare. He also highlighted the nutritional value of the grain, making WH 1402 a holistic choice for farmers aiming for both quality and quantity in their produce.

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