1. Agriculture World

FAO Recognizes Tribal Farming Practices in 3 Districts of Rajasthan

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has recognized tribal agricultural techniques in Banswara, Dungarpur, and Pratapgarh without damaging the health of the soil. The FAO, which is funded by the United Nations, found the measures to be creative and sustainable for resource-scarce areas.

Ayushi Raina
Tribal Farming Practices in 3 districts
Tribal Farming Practices in 3 districts

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has recognized tribal agricultural techniques in Banswara, Dungarpur, and Pratapgarh that are practiced without damaging the health of the soil.  

The FAO, which is funded by the United Nations, found the measures to be creative and sustainable for resource-scarce areas.

A report on the subject titled 'Participatory learning action is critical for community action to promote soil biodiversity' highlighted how the technique is revitalizing soil health. The report was released by VAAGDHARA in Italy on April 19-22.

Organic farming methods include mixed farming, the agro approach, the spraying of buttermilk, jaggery solution, and liquid manure. The VAAGDHARA started a campaign called Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) to document traditional nutrition-sensitive agricultural methods that are fading with the flow of time.

VAAGDHARA secretary Jayesh Joshi stated that they picked up farmers in Banswara and recorded instructional movies on soil health and biodiversity in the regional language.

"They've discovered plants and animals that are advantageous to them in terms of soil health, which has also been documented," Joshi explained.

The campaign does not come to an end here. The report emphasized how community action may aid in the achievement of the Sustainable Development Groups (SDGs) through preventing soil harm. The SDG 'Zero Hunger' eventually advocates treating malnutrition through local solutions.

As a result of the initiative, farmers in Rajasthan's tribal belt revived a large number of traditional practices while abandoning ready-made approaches such as the use of Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria (PSB), Trichoderma, and Rhizobium, which is solely focused on increasing crop production.  As part of involving women in conserving traditional practices, the campaign trained over 600 indigenous women who learned to link soil health with practices and farming systems.

"They now include legumes in mixed cropping which function as natural fertilizers, crop rotation, agro-forestry, mulching, a homestead plantation, hedgerow adaptation, and grassy strip surrounding fields," Joshi stated.

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