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Know Why You Must Eat Fish in Winter

Winter is miserable for a lot of people. Incoming cold weather means lots of cancelled plans, overeating, and the general feeling of malaise and sadness. However, recent studies show that our mood depends on what we eat. Fish is one such food that can turn our frown upside down during winter.

Aarushi Chadha
Fish
Eating fish is good for your heart

Winter is a tough season for many people. The cold weather forces us to cancel our plans and linger around the house all of the time. This usually leads to oversleeping, overeating, and a general disregard for our physical health. Studies show that our mood depends on the food we eat because serotonin (the chemical that controls our mood and emotions) receptors are in the walls of our stomach.

By eating a healthy and nutritious diet, we are keeping the bacteria present in our gut happy which in turn makes us happy. Fish is a type of food that is considered great for consumption in winter for many reasons. Fish is a superfood that is rich in nutrients and good fatty acids which promote a stronger constitution. Now, let’s take a look at scientifically backed reasons why eating fish in winter is beneficial for us.

Benefits of eating fish

Good for the heart- The cold weather tends to put a strain on the heart. Plus, with unhealthy eating habits and reduced physical activity, we put our cardiovascular health at significant risk. According to a study published by the American Journal of Cardiology, regularly consuming fish is associated with a lowered risk of coronary heart disease. Eating fish, which is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, at least twice a week tends to offset dangers associated with cardiovascular diseases such as increased blood pressure and stroke.

Promotes better mental health- Seasonal affective disorder or SAD is experienced commonly by people in winter. During this time, lack of sunlight leads to a deficiency of vitamin D as well which contributes to bad mood. Therefore, doctors and nutritionists recommend supplements and foods rich in vitamin D during winter. Fishes such as mackerel, tuna, and salmon are rich in vitamin D. 

Also, they also promote better cardiovascular health. Certain fish oils, such as cod liver oil, can deliver at least 200 % of vitamin D’s daily value.

Improves Vision- Certain types of fish are extremely rich in omega-3 fatty acids which are useful for improving vision and overall eye health. Omega-3 fatty acids preserve the health of the eyes and increase their function.

Eating fish benefits your skin- In winter, if not properly cared for, our skin can become dry and flaky. The cold weather is extremely hard on our skin and can deteriorate its health significantly. Fishes that are rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids make the top layer of our skin stronger in order to prevent our skin from naturally drying out. Studies also show that eating fish can clear mild to serious acne.

Protects the lungs- The cold weather during winter makes us susceptible to cold and other respiratory infections. However, fish that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids increases the flow of air to the lungs. It also increases our immunity levels and helps us fight off respiratory infections.

Improves sleep schedule- According to a study reported in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, increases consumption of fish improves our sleep pattern because of the high levels of vitamin D present in the fish.

Lowers cholesterol- Omega-3 fatty acids present in fish help minimize LDL or bad cholesterol in the body. According to research conducted by the Medical Centre Procedures of Baylor University, it was found that omega-3 fatty acids present in fish can significantly impact the cholesterol in our body by reducing LDL and increasing HDL or good cholesterol.

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