1. Agriculture World

100,000+ Farmers Are Now Aware of Climate-Resilient Farming Methods

An initiative was launched in 2019, which has helped 100.00 farmers to learn about climate-resilient agricultural strategies.

Kritika Madhukar
Managing the negative impacts of climate change is critical for farmers' livelihoods and overall food security.
Managing the negative impacts of climate change is critical for farmers' livelihoods and overall food security.

Droughts and floods are common in Bihar, prompting the government to take steps to protect agriculture and agriculturists from climate-related risks. Since a new initiative was begun for the purpose in 2019 spanning 40 villages in eight districts, almost 100,000 farmers in Bihar have become familiar with climate-resilient agricultural approaches. In 2020, the program was expanded to 190 communities in 38 districts.

Officials from the Agriculture Department said the study has yielded promising findings and might change the way farmers farm in the face of climate change, boosting not only agricultural productivity but also farmer income.

Droughts and floods are common in Bihar, prompting the government to take steps to protect crops and agriculturists from climate-related risks.

Climate Change Affecting Major Crops

Climate change is putting agriculture in jeopardy, putting farmers at risk. It presents a problem for policymakers. According to numerous estimates, the production of some of the major crops such as wheat and rice is anticipated to drop by 10% to 40% by 2050.

Managing the negative impacts of climate change is critical for farmers' livelihoods and overall food security. 

According to N Sarvana Kumar, the state's principal secretary for agriculture, climate change is especially difficult for small and marginal farmers, who account for over 90% of Bihar's farming population.

He also stated that the Borlaug Institute for South Asia (BISA) in Samastipur's Pusa is working on climate-resilient crop production methods. During his trip to the institute a few years ago, Chief Minister Nitish Kumar praised the initiatives undertaken at the BISA farm and directed the agriculture department and all agricultural research institutions to develop a work plan to replicate the technology across the state. CRA (climate-resilient agriculture) was born as a result.

The scientists are teaching farmers how to use the procedures established at the BISA farm. They comprise crop cultivation without traditional tillage, crop residue management in situ, and the production of three crops per year with a productivity of up to 150 quintals per hectare. For demonstration, fourteen cropping schemes have been identified.

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