1. Agriculture World

Exporters Surprised by Increased Demand for Alphonso Mangoes in US Markets

Mango exports to the United States have consistently climbed, from 80 tonnes in 2007-08 to 1,300 tonnes just before the epidemic.

Shruti Kandwal
More demand for Alphonso mangoes in American markets.
More demand for Alphonso mangoes in American markets.

It's that time of year again, when all the Desis in America go scouring Asian grocery shops for the famed mangoes of the Indian subcontinent. After the harsh pandemic-induced limitations, a delicious surprise awaits in the shape of sunny mangoes from India.  

It will be widely available now that the USDA has cleared the shipment of mangoes from India to the United States.

Exporters have noticed more demand for Alphonso mangoes in American markets this year than for regular Kesar mangoes. According to exporters, this is the first time that Alphonso is in higher demand in American markets.

Mango exports to the United States have consistently climbed, from 80 tonnes in 2007-08 to 1,300 tonnes just before the epidemic.

Exporters, on the other hand, say they've been pleasantly pleased by the response to Indian mangoes this year. 

Most exporters indicated they were skeptical of the market at the start of the season because of the pandemic-induced halt and high freight costs. Air freight prices are now as high as Rs 520-550/kg, up from Rs 200-225/kg previously.

While Indian mangoes remain in great demand in the United States, mango sellers regard America as a market with enormous potential. Mango exports to the United States totaled $4.35 million in 2019-20, up nearly 20% from $3.63 million in 2018-19.

The demand from the US market remained high, according to Kaushal Khakhar, CEO of Kay Bee Exporters, the country's largest fruits and vegetable exporter. "We were anxious at the start of the season, so export quantities were lower than normal." "However, the mangoes that came from India were well received by US customers, and we have expanded shipments currently," he added.

Alphonso appears to be a larger hit with end users this year. "We're also shocked, because Alphonso is the most difficult to treat." "Exporters and consumers like the sturdy Kesar," he explained. Exporters choose Kesar because of its longer shelf life and toughness.

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