1. Agriculture World

Russia May Downgrade Its 2022-23 Grain Export Plan: Agriculture Ministry

Crop harvesting in Russia, the world's largest wheat exporter, is currently slower than expected due to a cold spring, a late start, rain, and a lack of spare parts for foreign agricultural equipment, according to the ministry.

Shivam Dwivedi
Dmitry Patrushev, Russian Agriculture Minister
Dmitry Patrushev, Russian Agriculture Minister

According to Russian Agriculture Minister Dmitry Patrushev, there is a chance that the nation won't harvest 130 million tonnes of grain this year and that it would scale back its export plans. Climate anomalies and logistical issues, according to the ministry, are additional factors posing serious threats to global food security in the current crop year.

"All of this raises questions about harvesting the 130 million tonnes of grain." There will be no problems because we will completely give our market. Of course, we will completely supply our market; that will not be a problem."

“However, if the planned volumes are not met, Patrushev explained, "we will have to revise our plans to export 50 million tonnes." "This may have a negative impact on the global grain market."

Crop harvesting in Russia, the world's largest wheat exporter, is currently slower than expected due to a cold spring, a late start, rain, and a lack of spare parts for foreign agricultural equipment, according to the ministry.

Russia provides grain to African and Middle Eastern countries that rely heavily on imports. Western countries have imposed a slew of economic sanctions in an attempt to compel Moscow to withdraw its forces, which have taken control of roughly one-fifth of Ukraine's territory.

The sanctions have complicated logistics and payment processing for Russian grain exporters, but they have also limited the availability of spare parts for a wide range of Western-made equipment.

Moscow has blamed the sanctions for a 20 percent reduction in the volume of gas supplied to Germany and other European Union countries via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline. Germany rejects the claim, claiming that there is no legal or technical reason for Gazprom, the state-controlled gas producer, to reduce gas flow.

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