1. Animal Husbandry

MP University Introduces Chocolate for Cattles That Increases Milk Yield

Ayushi Raina
Ayushi Raina
cattle eating grass and milk

Many innovations have been developed by agricultural scientists in the nation in the ongoing hunt for improved cattle feed. The most recent one involves chocolate.

The Nanaji Deshmukh Veterinary Science University in Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, has created a chocolate-infused cattle feed that claims to boost milk output, enhance animal health, and be a cost-effective option.

'Narmada Vita Min Lick' is the name of the chocolate feed.

“Green fodder would be great for dairy farmers to feed their livestock. Unfortunately, that might not always be always available. And market-available cattle feed is an expensive option," says Sunil Nayak, the university's director of the animal nutrition department.

The organization had been studying and researching alternate nutritional feed for the cattle, he said. "We wanted to create something that was affordable and accessible to even local dairy farmers," he stated.

Chocolate feed for Cattles

"The animal nutrition department was challenged with producing a nutritious food supplement for cattle, and the specialists came up with the chocolate lick, which meets the nutritional demands of the cattle," Sita Prasad Tiwari, vice-chancellor of the Nanaji Deshmukh Veterinary Science University, said.

The university's scientists have created two distinct products. The first is Narmada Min, a mineral combination, and the second is Narmada Vita Min Lick, a chocolate feed including molasses and other ingredients.

The ISO certification has been granted to both the products (ISO 9001:2015). 

Cows, buffalos, sheep, and goats were given both products to test, and their milk output, reproductive capacities, and improved immunity.

"The Narmada Min combination costs 75 rupees per kilo to dairy farmers, whereas the Narmada Vit Min Lick costs 55 rupees per kilo," added Nayak. Other mineral combinations, he pointed out, cost Rs.100 or more per kg.

“The cattle keep licking the chocolate because it gives them the nutrients they need,” Nayak explained. However, he expressed sorrow for not being able to divulge the additional components used in the lick's creation.

Krishi Vigyan Kendras in Madhya Pradesh have stocked up with Narmada Vita Min Lick and Narmada Min, which dairy farmers may purchase.

Bareilly's cattle chocolates and laddoos

Similar cattle chocolates and laddoos have been produced by the Indian Veterinary Research Institute (IVRI) in Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh, for dairy producers to feed their livestock.

Molasses, mineral salts, bran, urea, salt, and other nutritional components are used to make these supplements.

These supplements have been found to improve milk output in milch cattle by up to 18%, according to the institution in Bareilly. The supplement has also increased cattle appetite, and the supplement's high protein content has enabled the cattle conceive more easily, according to the scientists.

The Indian Veterinary Research Institute offers dairy farmers training so that they may produce the supplement in the comfort of their own homes.

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