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Oxford’s Invites you for “HINDI” Word of the Year 2017



Oxford is the synonymous of Dictionary and hence of the vast vocabulary that encapsulate in its pages. In a new,  Oxford has invited applications from all across to find HINDI WORD of the year 2017. Oxford, which has lately launched  the hindi dictionary expects and invites a hindi to term it as the word of the year. Agriculture is a subject which involves people of abundant hindi knowledge and hence Krishi Jagran motivates everyone to be a part of this maiden event of Oxford.

The word needs not to be a new one  but should reflect the ethos, mood, or preoccupations of India. The winning suggestion will be a word (or expression) that was popular over the last 12 months or has attracted a lot of attention or interest.  The Hindi word of the year for 2017 is planned to be announced in January next year. The rightful winner, would be chosen after going through all the applications which should be submitted before November 29. Oxford Dictionaries has called on Hindi speakers across the country to submit their suggestions.

Hindi Dictionaries team at Oxford University Press (OUP ) will chose the HINDI word of the year after taking in consideration, the public suggestions. The team would also be assisted by an advisory panel of language experts.

The panel of hindi language experts includes writer-publisher Namita Gokhle, Indian language expert Kritika Agrawal, journalist Saurabh Dwivedi, senior editorial manager at OUP India Malika Ghosh, and Ranchi University associate professor Poonam Nigam Sahay.

The Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year is a word or expression that has attracted a great deal of interest over the last 12 months. Every year, we debate several candidates for word of the year and choose a winner that is judged to reflect the ethos, mood, or preoccupations of that particular year and to have lasting potential as a word of cultural significance.  The 2016 English Word of the Year 2016 is “Post Truth”.The concept of ‘post-truth’ has been in existence for the past decade, but Oxford Dictionaries has seen a spike in frequency the past year in the context of Brexit and the US presidential election.

 



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