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Vegetable Prices in Bengaluru Expected to Surge as Festival Season Approaches

Even usually affordable vegetables like cabbage and pumpkin have seen a significant price increase, with the former costing ₹40 per kg and the latter ₹15.

Shruti Kandwal
The Hassan district's potato farms have also been impacted by the rain.
The Hassan district's potato farms have also been impacted by the rain.

Even though the market price of vegetables typically declines between July and August (the month of Ashada) in Bengaluru, this year's prices have increased during the past 10 days.

Recent rains have caused crop loss and a decrease in supplies, which have raised prices. Traders predict that as we approach the festival and wedding seasons, prices will only continue to rise (month of Shravana starting July 29).

With a wholesale price of 70 and a retail price of about 85 per kilogram, beans are once again at the top of the list.

The cost of capsicum has fluctuated significantly over the past few days, averaging between 80 and 90 rupees at retail markets.

"A few days ago, capsicum prices reached nearly ₹100 per kilo. Then it started to fall once again. It is currently between 80 and 85," a manager at HOPCOMS said.

He continued by saying that in recent weeks, a rising trend in vegetable prices had been noticed.

Even usually affordable vegetables like cabbage and pumpkin have seen a significant price increase, with the former costing ₹40 per kg and the latter ₹15.

According to a trader, during the season, pumpkin prices rarely exceed ₹10 per kilogram.

Although the monsoon has hampered the crops in some areas, the rains earlier this year were able to successfully bring a good supply of vegetables to the marketplaces.

According to Sridhar of the K.R. Market Vegetable Traders' Association, "As the monsoon picks up speed in the following weeks, prices will significantly rise. The month of Shravana will shortly begin and bring festivals, which may cause a slight increase in demand."

The wedding season will also begin following the Varamahalakshmi festival, another trader named Manjunath said. Vegetable prices will undoubtedly increase.

The Hassan district's potato farms have also been impacted by the rain (the leading producer of the crop in the State).

However, traders claim that there is still enough supply to meet the demand. "The cost of other vegetables has changed a little bit. However, despite the damages, potato and onion prices have remained consistent," according to B.L. Shankarappa, president of the Potato and Onion Traders Association, Yeshwanthpur.

A 50-kilogram bag of potatoes is priced between ₹800 and ₹1,000, while a bag of onions costs ₹700 to ₹800. 

The fact that this year's festival season will cost more is upsetting to consumers who have long suffered from rising commodity prices.

Nidhi Shrinivasa, a resident of Bengaluru, has found a solution to the problem of rising vegetable prices and said, “Festivals are inevitable in India. My family and I celebrate numerous festivals. Along with that, we prepare a huge amount of food and sweets. A week before the festival begins the prices of vegetables increase, which is inevitable. So, most of the time we plan things that can be stored for a longer time and buy them first. The rest of the vegetables can only be stored for three to four days. We try to get it as cheap as possible. In my home, we also grow some small vegetables in our backyard. We try to minimize the number of items if the prices of vegetables are very much high.”

It is that time of the year again for tomatoes

After a record high of ₹120 per kg, tomato prices have yet again crashed owing to excessive supply.

The price per kilogram varies between K.R. Market and HOPCOMS, with the highest quality going for ₹25 per kilogram.

"This is evidence that vegetable prices fall just as quickly as they rise. There aren't enough buyers in the city since everyone is sowing tomatoes in their fields, according to Sridhar of the K.R. Market Vegetable Traders' Association.

Additionally, earlier this week, it was reported that farmers in Kolar dumped their tomatoes on the streets due to the low prices.

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