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Heatwave Protection: Do’s and Don’ts to Protect Yourself From Scorching Temperature

A heatwave is declared by the Health Ministry when the temperature of a station reaches 40°C or higher in the plains, 30°C or higher in hilly regions, and 37°C or higher at coastal stations.

Laavanya Arya
A heatwave is declared by the Health Ministry when the temperature of a station reaches 40°C or higher in the plains, 30°C or higher in hilly regions, and 37°C or higher at coastal stations.
A heatwave is declared by the Health Ministry when the temperature of a station reaches 40°C or higher in the plains, 30°C or higher in hilly regions, and 37°C or higher at coastal stations.

In India, Heatwaves generally occur from March to June, and in a few rare cases, extend till the end of July. The heatwave is a condition of air temperature that becomes deadly to human body when exposed. It is defined based on the temperature thresholds over a region in terms of actual temperature or its departure from normal.

 In some nations, it is defined in terms of the heat index based on temperature & humidity or based on the extreme percentile of temperatures. Heatwave is considered if the maximum temperature of a region reaches 400C or more for Plains & 300C or above for Hilly regions.

Precautions and preparations to do before hot weather arrives

  • Find ways to stay cool before the hot weather arrives.

  • Set up air conditioning and fans to keep your house cool.

  • Find out where you can cool off during COVID-19, such as public libraries, malls, and municipal cooling centres, while adhering to public health guidelines.

  • Find out where you can get some relief from the heat, such as public libraries, shopping malls, and municipal cooling centres.

  • Discuss heat safety with your family members. Prepare for possible power outages wherever you spend time – at home, work, and school.

What should you do to stay safe during the heatwave?

DO’S

  • Stay in the shade and avoid going outside.

  • When going outside, wear a cap, umbrella, hat, or carry a towel.

  • Wear light-coloured clothing made of thin, loose cotton.

  • Drink water, salted drinks like lassi, lemon water, ORS, and fruit juices on a regular basis.

  • Consume fruits such as cucumber, watermelon, lemon, orange, and so on.

  • Shower frequently and experiment with lowering the room temperature using fans, coolers, air conditioning, and indoor plants.

  • Children, pregnant women, the elderly, and those with pre-existing medical conditions should be moved to a cooler location and sponged with cold water, or they should be transported to the nearest health facility if they feel ill.

Don’ts

  • Avoid going out in the sun, particularly between noon and 3 p.m.

  • Avoid physically demanding activities in the afternoon.

  • Tea, coffee, and carbonated soft drinks should be avoided.

  • Avoid leaving pets or children in parked cars.

  • Wearing synthetic, dark-coloured, and tight clothing is not recommended.

Things to keep in mind once heat wave is gone

  • Allow fresh air to circulate through your home by opening windows and blinds.

  • Check on your neighbours, friends, and family members, especially those who are in danger.

  • Continue to drink water to stay hydrated.

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