1. Home
  2. Agriculture World

Experts Warn of Floods After Cloud- Seeding Activities in China's Chongqing

The recent heatwave and drought on the Chinese mainland have severely harmed agriculture, putting the harvest in "severe jeopardy." According to China's Agriculture Ministry, the current heat wave is the worst in the country's history, dating back more than 60 years. Southern China, in particular, has experienced the longest period of sustained high temperatures and little rain.

Shivam Dwivedi
Chinese Flood
Chinese Flood

Some parts of China's Chongqing welcomed long-awaited rains recently after cloud seeding activities were carried out to bring precipitation. However, experts are now warning of possible flooding and landslides.

In the midst of severe heatwaves and drought, some parts of Chongqing city in Southern China welcomed long-awaited rains, as the southwestern municipality has been subjected to brutally hot temperatures for several days this summer.

Rain fell in some areas of neighbouring Sichuan province, according to China Daily. The country's National Meteorological Center predicted heavy rains in most of Sichuan and Chongqing over the next 10 days. It is expected to rain five to eight days, with precipitation 40-100 percent higher than the normal level for the period, and isolated areas will receive twice the usual amount.

"As a result, residents in affected areas should brace themselves for flooding and landslides, as the ongoing dry spell has rendered caked hillsides less able to absorb fast-moving waters." According to Zhang Yan of the city's meteorological bureau, the ongoing heat wave in Chongqing is expected to ease, with daily highs in most parts of the municipality struggling to reach 35 degrees Celsius and widespread rainfall forecast.

"The city should brace itself for the impending downpours," he said, according to China Daily. This summer, the world's second-largest economy has been hit by record temperatures, flash floods, and droughts, all of which scientists have warned will become more frequent and intense as a result of climate change.

The recent heatwave and drought on the Chinese mainland have severely harmed agriculture, putting the harvest in "severe jeopardy." According to China's Agriculture Ministry, the current heat wave is the worst in the country's history, dating back more than 60 years. Southern China, in particular, has experienced the longest period of sustained high temperatures and little rain.

China's rice farmers have been hit the hardest by the recent drought and heatwave. Water levels in China are so low that some inland river shipping routes are no longer safe, according to the report, which adds that "a lot of agricultural commodities that are imported pass through these shipping routes, which will now be extended by five days, increasing business costs."

Chongqing and Sichuan have also been battling wildfires since last week, which have been exacerbated by high temperatures and a lack of water. According to the meteorological administration, "the high temperatures have largely subsided in south China, Jiangxi, and Anhui."

Villagers in rural Sichuan and Chongqing are suffering from a lack of drinking and agricultural water. Because of the increased demand for water, they were forced to take more water from rivers for irrigation. As a result, many parts of China's largest river, the Yangtze, have completely dried up. Its size has also shrunk significantly. In addition, 66 other rivers have completely dried up.

On Tuesday, the National Weather Service issued new drought and high-temperature warnings, urging 11 provincial governments to "activate" emergency response plans. To combat this ongoing situation, Chongqing's Wansheng district carried out cloud seeding activities on Friday in order to bring the region long-awaited precipitation not seen since August 7. Seeding also caused rain in other districts, including Ba'nan and Qijiang.

"The heat and drought conditions in Chongqing's 22 districts and counties have been slightly alleviated since Thursday following Chongqing's enhanced mass cloud seeding operations," the Chongqing Meteorological Bureau said at a news conference on Friday, according to China Daily. "The city is looking for more opportunities to artificially induce precipitation," according to the Bureau.

Take a Quiz on Green Revolution Take a quiz
Share your comments
FactCheck in Agriculture Project

Subscribe to our Newsletter. You choose the topics of your interest and we'll send you handpicked news and latest updates based on your choice.

Subscribe Newsletters