1. Home
  2. Agriculture World

Farmers Hopeful to Get Good Price for Alibag’s GI Tagged White Onion Gets

Farmers in Alibag claim that white onions have been grown here for centuries using only traditional and genuine seeds. Locals have learned and mastered the skills required for white onion cultivation. According to farmers, Alibag's geo-climatic conditions distinguish it from other white onion-producing areas, and this is why Alibag white onion has developed a distinct taste, flavour, and shape.

Shivam Dwivedi
White Onion
White Onion

Alibag, in Maharashtra's Raigad district, is a popular tourist destination due to its picturesque beaches. However, this historic location will now be recognized for the Geographical Indication (GI) tagged white onion. The GI for this onion, known for its sweetness, has been accepted. Last week, it was published in the government gazette.

"The GI tag provides a distinct identity to the white onion, which has medicinal properties and has been grown in a traditional manner for a long time." Farmers will benefit directly because the white onion will command a higher price as a result of the GI tag," said Ganesh Hingmire, Chairman of Great Mission Group Consultancy (GMGC), who was involved in the process of obtaining the GI tag for Alibag white onion.

Farmers in Alibag claim that white onions have been grown here for centuries using only traditional and genuine seeds. Locals have learned and mastered the skills required for white onion cultivation.

According to farmers, Alibag's geo-climatic conditions distinguish it from other white onion-producing areas, and this is why Alibag white onion has developed a distinct taste, flavour, and shape.

According to Ganesh Hingmire, the GI tag will help white onion farmers in Alibag gain a larger export market. "It (GI tag) increases export potential, which has aided other products like chiku (Sapodilla) from Gholwad, Keshar mango from Marathwada, and bananas from Jalgaon," he said.

Members of the Maharashtra State Onion Producer Farmer Organization believe the government should encourage exports so that farmers do not have to suffer as they did last year.

Maharashtra's onion exports fell to 5.8 lakh tonnes in FY22, down from 7.9 lakh tonnes in FY21. Farmers and traders in Nashik, Maharashtra's onion hub, said wholesale prices in the domestic market were slightly higher than export prices, so farmers preferred to sell their produce locally.

"In addition, higher freight charges and government policies to ban export and impose higher minimum export prices have discouraged farmers from entering the export market," says Bharat Dighole, President of the Maharashtra State Onion Producer Farmer Organization.

Magnoliaceous Quiz: Take a Quiz on National Mango Day Take a quiz
Share your comments
FactCheck in Agriculture Project

Subscribe to our Newsletter. You choose the topics of your interest and we'll send you handpicked news and latest updates based on your choice.

Subscribe Newsletters