1. Health & Lifestyle

Does Eating Eggs Lead To High Cholesterol: Read To Find Out!

Do eggs cause us to have high cholesterol levels? Various researches provide information.

Chintu Das

Chicken eggs are a good source of protein and other nutrients at a low cost. They're also heavy in cholesterol by nature. However, the cholesterol in eggs does not appear to elevate cholesterol levels in the same way that trans fats and saturated fats do.

Although some studies have discovered a relationship between eating eggs and heart disease, these findings might be due to other factors. Meat items, which are commonly eaten with eggs, may increase the risk of heart disease more than eggs. Furthermore, the way eggs and other meals are prepared, particularly if fried in oil or butter may have a bigger impact in the elevated risk of heart disease than the eggs themselves.

The average healthy person may have up to seven eggs each week without raising their risk of heart disease. According to some research, this amount of egg consumption may even help against some forms of stroke and macular degeneration, a serious eye condition that can lead to blindness.

However, other data show that eating seven eggs each week raises your risk of heart disease if you have diabetes. Other studies, on the other hand, failed to uncover the same link. According to another study, consuming eggs may raise the likelihood of having diabetes in the first place. To determine the relationship between eggs, diabetes, and heart disease, more study is required.

Experts now recommend consuming as little dietary cholesterol as possible, aiming for less than 300 milligrammes (mg) per day. A big egg contains around 186 mg of cholesterol, all of which is concentrated in the yolk. According to some research, eating up to one egg every day is a good decision if your diet contains minimal other cholesterol.

Use only the egg whites if you want eggs but don't want the cholesterol. Although egg whites do not contain cholesterol, they do contain protein. Cholesterol-free egg alternatives prepared using egg whites are also an option.

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